Autonews > Hi-Tech > Forum

Installes bi-stereo

Tout ce qui concerne de près ou de loin le son et l'image dans la voiture et qui ne rentre pas dans les autres sections

Installes bi-stereo

Message par Ludobrev » 30 Juillet 2008, 10:46

[img]http://img375.imageshack.us/img375/1665/0602cae01z1987mercedesbnl6.jpg[/img]

[img]http://img76.imageshack.us/img76/3320/0602cae02z1987mercedesbdd4.jpg[/img]

[img]http://img187.imageshack.us/img187/2981/0602cae03z1987mercedesbax7.jpg[/img]

[img]http://img76.imageshack.us/img76/2995/0602cae05z1987mercedesbjg3.jpg[/img]

[URL=http://imageshack.us][img]http://img187.imageshack.us/img187/9279/0602cae06z1987mercedesbxc6.jpg[/img][/URL]

[URL=http://imageshack.us][img]http://img187.imageshack.us/img187/4289/0602cae07z1987mercedesbsl3.jpg[/img][/URL]

[URL=http://imageshack.us][img]http://img375.imageshack.us/img375/4483/0602cae09z1987mercedesbxd3.jpg[/img][/URL]

[URL=http://imageshack.us][img]http://img187.imageshack.us/img187/1429/0602cae11z1987mercedesbfk4.jpg[/img][/URL]

1987 Mercedes-Benz 560SEC - Xact Sound - Installation
It Took More Than A New York Minute For Philip Petracca To Build The World's Best-Sounding 1987 Mercedes-Benz 560SEC.


writer: Richard Truesdell
photographer: Richard Truesdell



Philip Petracca is an audio competitor, a 15-year veteran of the soundoff wars. He's steadily worked his way up the competition ranks, starting in 1991 with a Chevy Baretta equipped with the then-standard winning combination of an Alpine source unit, PPI amplifiers, MB Quart full-range speakers with the foundation provided by JL Audio subwoofers. His current ride, a no-compromise Mercedes-Benz 560SEC, mates classic eighties style with cutting-edge technology working in concert to provide the definitive in-car listening experience.

Currently, Petracca has what must be considered one of the dream jobs in the industry as the head of product development for XACT Communication, one of the primary suppliers of Sirius Satellite Radio hardware. He's held a number of positions with Verizon Wireless, T-Mobile and Sirius Satellite Radio.

Petracca purchased his dream ride, a 1987 Mercedes 560SEC, back in 2000 as he began competing at the national level, gaining a degree of notoriety. But a little over a year ago he decided it wasn't enough to just compete at the high-est levels-he needed to win. To do so, he assembled an installation dream team of industry veterans, Gary Biggs, Kent Buller and Mark Eldridge, who translated his radical designs into a vehicle that now rivals some of the legends of the genre.

No Compromise, No LimitsAs Petracca tells it, his car is the very rare case in which a mobile sound system installation is taken up to, and beyond, the edges of the conventional envelope. For most enthusiasts, the time, technology and finances required simply would serve as the firewall between a great-sounding car and one that could compete against the world's best. And these days, it's even rarer to experience a system that is purely dedicated to the pursuit of audio excellence.

For starters, there's no video in this system to distract attention from its audio excellence. In an era where many people believe good sound is compressed audio coming from an iPod experienced through cheap ear buds, listening to this particular Mercedes is a revelation. There was only one restriction on the design brief, not to destroy the car as it is still drivable. But while the functionality of the car couldn't be compromised, it wouldn't get in the way of the sound, whether the traditional 2-channel programming as well as all the flavors of the multi-channel world: Dolby Digital, DTS and DVD-Audio.

The layout of the system is deceptively simple. Dead-center of the radically restructured dash, sits an Alpine F#1 Status DVI-9990 AM/FM/CD/DVD-Audio source unit, the flagship successor to the legendary 7909. Two PXA-H990 processors installed in the back deck handle the signal processing chores while the trunk has been redesigned to accept six Zapco custom hand-built amplifiers: four 4-channel amps with a pair of 2-channel amps bridged into mono. One 2-channel powers the JBL W10GTi 10" sub in a sealed enclosure in the center stack while the other powers the companion W15GTi 15" sub in the ported enclosure where the rear seats once resided.

The all-important full-range speaker requirements were also filled by Zapco with an all new line of separates. Zapco, a subsidiary of ARPA of America, turned to Italy and corporate cousin ESB, for the line of hand-built separates that will form the basis of Zapco's new Competition Series. The speakers feature ESB's latest technology and will arrive at Zapco dealers in the first quarter of 2006.

Maximizing the advantage of the new drivers, the Benz' interior and trunk were gutted, giving Biggs, Buller and Eldridge a blank canvas, save for the sound deadening materials installed in the previous upgrade. Everything behind the dash was removed, including the air conditioner, all instrumentation and gauges, as well as all un-necessary wiring and other components. What was left of the factory wiring harness was cleaned up and moved so that it would allow the front stage speakers to be installed in optimal locations, in the hope of eliminating any reflected sounds.

"The specific locations and installation of the front speakers is absolutely the most critical factor in determining the end sound quality result," says Eldridge. "It is well known that a moderate-quality speaker installed properly will always outperform an ultra high-quality speaker installed poorly. In the case of the Benz, the ultra high-quality speakers were installed in the best locations, and in their optimal enclosures. That, combined with the highly modified, acoustically controlled listening environment inside the car, resulted in an incredibly good-sounding system."

"The first step in the interior design was to locate the seats as far rearward and towards the center as possible. This allows the listeners to be further from the speakers and more centered between them. This minimizes the path length difference between the left and right speakers, allowing for a more coherent wave front with minimal time arrival and intensity differences, resulting in a much more controlled and stable soundstage and spatial qualities," says Biggs.

"The next step was to make as much room as possible up front for speakers and acoustical treatments, without sacrificing the structural integrity of the car. To this end, some of the non-critical metal in the fire wall area was moved, or removed and rebuilt in a different way to allow for optimum speaker placement. The windshield wiper system was removed, which allowed a significant improvement in speaker location possibilities. The metal below the windshield line was pushed forward as much as possible to make room for the midrange and midbass enclosures. Even after the modifications, none of the crush zones or structural metal was modified," says Buller.

While discussing the system, Eldridge, Biggs, Buller and Petracca explained that the placement of the speakers eliminates the early reflections from hard surfaces near each speaker. "There is no way that any electrical signal processor can correct for acoustical problems in the listening environment," says Eldridge. "Once the signal is converted to mechanical energy and leaves the speaker as a sound wave, it is at the mercy of the acoustical environment within the listening space." The design of the system and the placement of each speaker either eliminates reflected sound or directs the energy to surfaces specifically designed to absorb these signals."

The mids were placed first. The mids are located approximately 2" below the windshield, set back approximately 10" from the front of the new dash and 4" outward from both ends of each side of the new dash structure. Basically, they're in the engine compartment. The placement process uses test enclosures optimized for each driver with the exact location determined by a trial and error process. The midbass speakers were located next in the same manner. The tweeters were located last, adjacent to their respective midrange speakers. "Minimizing the distance separation between the mid and tweeter is very critical in order to create a coherent wave front without the inherent problems of comb filtering and other acoustical anomalies created when the tweeter is distant from the mid," adds Petracca.

It's All InsideIn their effort to fully optimize the listening experience, in addition to moving the seats 6" rearward, the pedal assemblies were modified to extend through the new false firewall. A custom steel assembly was fabricated, using high-quality linear bearings. The bearings allow the two 1/2" stainless steel quick release pins, with round aluminum pedals attached to them, to be inserted. When depressed, these new pedals actuate the brake and throttle controls. (The car is fully functional, as it was driven from the Las Vegas Convention Center to the parking deck at the New York New York Casino Hotel for our post SEMA Show photo shoot.)

The steering column support structure was then redesigned to minimize its size, getting it out of the way of the sound. The gauges (see sidebar) and controls were relocated to the center console area and the factory air conditioner system was totally removed. The modifications didn't stop there (see caption on the steering wheel).

Originally the Alpine DVI-9990 was mounted below the sound quality subwoofer in the center stack but ultimately the faceplate was relocated to a central location above the sub for better visibility. Behind the gauges and remote in the center console are a bank of switches to control important system functions: trunk open/close, system neon lighting, parking brake actuator, system and interior fans, audio system configuration (SQ only, SQ + SPL sub or SPL sub only) and hazard lights.

The rest of the interior is totally custom, but the modifications certainly can be characterized as low key. While it certainly isn't an OEM style, it isn't over the top as is often the case in show cars at this level. The primary goal, while using a variety of materials (paint, Ultraleather vinyl, suede, alligator skin, carpet, grille cloth and some tasteful aluminum details) and construction techniques, was strictly to optimize the listening experience. The cumbersome Mercedes OEM seats were discarded, replaced by Sparco sport seats reupholstered by Southeast Auto Trim in Tulsa, OK.

Behind the seats, the rear panel showcases the 15" JBL subwoofer, which seems to almost float above its enclosure. Petracca noted that throughout the installation, there are no visible fasteners. All fasteners are hidden behind trim pieces, OEM-style, to help with the overall clean appearance of the installation.

Import TuningAbove the subwoofer, flush-mounted into the rear deck, the pair of Alpine PXA-H990 processors are mounted between the rear speakers. Each speaker in the system is on a dedicated signal processing and amplification channel. No passive networks are used in the system.

The crossover points for the system are set at 2.8kHz between the mids and tweeters, 260Hz between the midbass and mids, and 80Hz from the sub to the midbass drivers. The crossover slopes vary from 12dB/octave to 36dB/octave, depending on what yielded the best sound quality for each set of speakers.

Signal delay is used only to align the speakers in each channel (i.e., the left tweeter, mid and midbass are all aligned, as are the center mid and tweeter, etc.). There is no differential delay between left and right channels. Because of the attention to detail in the design and installation of the speaker system, a differential left-right delay would not improve the sound quality from either seat.

The system required very minimal equalization, again due to the attention paid to the speaker system installation.

Employing Alpine's PXA-H990, the install team spent 60+ hours tuning over a six-week period and found the DTS Neo algorithm provided the best overall sound quality. Compared to the traditional 2-channel setting, it added additional space to the left and right sides of the soundstage, additional depth and a better sense of ambience. This is not to say that DTS Neo will work best in all systems. Every system design is different, and it is likely that one of the other settings may work better in a different vehicle.

The past 15 years of competition has rewarded Petracca with lifelong experiences and friendships. For him the best part has been seeing new people entering the hobby and bringing new outlooks and techniques that keep the old timers on their toes. He says, "The best advice I could give to a newcomer would be, get involved in our hobby for the love of music, cars and meeting people. If you do this for awards and accolades alone, the end result of your experience will not be nearly as rewarding."

HVAC + GaugesThe system takes a novel approach to ventilating the car during judging. Since running the engine is needed to run the HVAC system, Petracca has employed an external system to keep the car cool in summer and warm in winter.

Under the left rear trunk area are mounted three 2" diameter ventilation connectors. One connects to the left B-pillar vent, one to the right B-pillar vent, and the third to the amplifier rack area.

When at shows, a small home window-type air conditioner, run off a 120-volt AC supply, can be connected to the vent system to blow cold air into the interior and to the amplifiers. A return air duct extends from under the driver's seat area back to the window unit to complete the air conditioning system.

This allows the car to remain cool and comfortable inside when at a show, without having to run the engine. A second option that can be used when driving uses a small fan box, designed to attach to the three vent connectors. It takes fresh air from outside the vehicle and blows into the interior and amplifier area.

One additional detail caught our eye when sitting in the car-the new gauges located in the center console. Their elegant faces are in keeping with the overall interior concept. The gauges for speed, RPM, fuel level, oil pressure, water temperature and voltage are custom built by Classic Instruments (www.classicinstruments.net). Tom Gale, former vice president of design for DaimlerChrysler led the design team that produced these stunning gauges. The gauges have a unique look of spun metal and the center dial portions are precisely color matched to the car's theme. The gauges are hand built and have innovative design features such as curved glass lenses that flow into the contours of the stainless radial bezel. They accent the style and setting of the interior perfectly.



http://www.caraudiomag.com/features/0602_cae_1987_mercedes_benz_560_sec/index.html
Ludobrev
 
Message(s) : 2160
Inscription : 29 Décembre 2004, 23:00

Installes bi-stereo

Message par bouss » 30 Juillet 2008, 12:23

[quote]Alpine F#1 Status DVI-9990, the flagship successor to the legendary 7909[/quote] :miam:
500 is good
bouss
 
Message(s) : 10708
Inscription : 20 Août 2001, 22:00

Installes bi-stereo

Message par Ludobrev » 30 Juillet 2008, 13:25

[URL=http://imageshack.us][img]http://img75.imageshack.us/img75/5052/cae070601zbiggsregalcaroj6.jpg[/img][/URL]

The 8th Wonder of the World - The Biggs' Regal Revealed
The 8th Wonder of the World


writer: Jefferson Bryant
photographer: Jefferson Bryant, Carl Edwards

Ask SQ competitors which car they would most like to tear into and discover its secrets, and their answers would most likely be the same - Gary Biggs' seven-time World Champion Buick Regal. Everybody in the industry knows this car, in at least one of its many forms. Biggs' Regal is considered by many to be the most famous, or infamous to some, vehicle in car audio.

In an industry known for smoke and mirrors, the Regal's inner workings could be considered an automotive Houdini. What looks complicated and intricate is a simple faade, and what looks simple took serious engineering to facilitate proper acoustics. There are the usual tricks of the trade that garner points in competition - unique installation, sliding amps, lots of Dynamat. Then there are the over and above feats of engineering and acoustical design that really take the Regal to new heights. That is what makes this the granddaddy of all sound quality competition vehicles.

Recently, I had the extreme pleasure and honor of being the first journalist to see the Regal's inner workings. I spent a couple of days with Gary Biggs, getting the lowdown on what made this the world's best sounding car. Biggs opened up the Regal to show the world what it takes to be a seven-time world champion.

Sound DeadeningA key ingredient to any SQ car is lots of sound deadening. To that end, the Regal got it in spades. During the build, Biggs had the body on a rotisserie (a stand that allows the body to be rolled 360 degrees), and while upside down, the entire roof received 31/48" of fiberglass mat and four layers of Dynamat. The rest of the car also got the same four layers of Dynamat, creating an absolutely solid body that is devoid of any rattles or buzz. Biggs even went so far as to have a pad of lead septum sewn into his floor mats, helping isolate the listener's feet from the actual floor of the vehicle. This eliminated the chance of any vibrations coming off the floor to affect the listener's focus - a very cool trick.

Sound TrapThe next step in the build was creating the subwoofer enclosures and ampracks. There is more to this design than simply looks. The entire amprack and trunk area is designed to trap sound, minimizing reflections. The three PX300.4 amplifiers are mounted using aluminum stand-offs, creating about a 31/44" gap underneath the amps. This combined with the shape of the upper rack trap and trunk tunnel focuses the sound to the rear of the car, where it is basically trapped. This is an important part of the design, as sound reflections color the sound, reducing its clarity.

Path LengthEverything in the interior of the vehicle was taken into consideration during the design. While most other competition vehicle builders try to equalize the path lengths from the kick panels to the seats, nobody spent the time that Biggs did on the front seat's positioning. The seating positions are not only set back from the speaker positions, they were custom built and tuned to each other. The interior was divided into three equal sections. Then the seats were centered on the two middle lines. This creates equal positioning from the driver-side window to the driver's left ear, the driver's right ear to the passenger's head, and passenger's right ear to the passenger-side window. The effect of this design reduces the boundary effect, which modifies the perceived source of the sound due to reflections, and helps focus the imaging to the front and center of the vehicle.

Process That SourceThe source unit is an important piece of any system, and the Regal is no exception. The Denon DCT-Z1 head unit sends the audio to the processor. In order to create something different, Biggs removed the volume knob from the head unit and smoothed the faceplate. He then fabricated his own bracket and machined a large aluminum knob to control the head unit. This trick looks complicated, but in the end, a simple section of vacuum hose connects the new knob with the old, retaining the twist and push functions. Moving on, the JBL MS-8 processor allows the user to control virtually every aspect of the audio signal to optimize the sound of the system. The signal travels from there to the JBL A6000GTi amplifier for the two JBL 15" GTI subs and the three JBL PX300.4 amps that power the 10" GTI sub in the firewall and the 660GTI mids and tweets.

Secret Kick PanelsLike most competitors, the design of the kick panels is the single most closely guarded secret to the Regal. This is where the most smoke and mirrors are used to keep other competitors from figuring out their tricks. Biggs has played a great game, and the truth is quite surprising. The kick panels you see when looking inside the car contain no speakers, they are simply grilles, hiding the actual panels.

The speaker locations themselves are not really even panels, but metal plates welded to the car. The speakers are mounted parallel to each other, 90 degrees to the door, in 11/44" aluminum plate. The JBL components are designed for a 30-degree off-axis response. That means that the best sound is heard when sitting 30 degrees from the center of the speaker. In Biggs' car, each listening position places the listener in the primary lobe of the speaker, yielding the best possible sound from that speaker.

Dashing EffectsThe design of the dash also affects the sound. The dash is symmetrical, which equalizes the reflections. The firewall is as smooth as possible; again, it's all about reflections. The grille on top of the dash is nothing more than decoration - more smoke and mirrors. The Regal has no center channel, contrary to popular belief.

There is one other little trick Biggs used on the midrange driver in the front stage. Doug Winker, an acoustical engineer at JBL, designed a "diffraction ring." What this ring does is help minimize the secondary lobes coming off the side of the speaker. The ring is made of aluminum and starting just past the surround, a star-pattern is cut from the center. The teeth are of a random shape and size. There is serious engineering behind the rings' design, too much to get into here, but it seems to work for Biggs.

This is the first time anyone has been allowed to see the inner workings of the Regal - not even judges have seen the kick panels or looked under the dash. Having retired the Regal from competition, Biggs felt it was time to break the mirrors and blow out the smoke. The doors are open and then panels are off for us to take a look for the first time.

Biggs is very particular when it comes to finishing his builds. To that effect, the wiring in every aspect of the car is perfect. No loose wires or un-terminated ends, every wire is terminated, shrink-sleeved and bundled with like wires in loom. The entire car is clean and well-built, not just the part shown to the judges. This section is under the JBL A6000GTi amplifier in the trunk.

A desire to attain symmetry spawned the custom dash. The dash was built with a wood frame, fitting tight with the firewall, wrapped in Select Products blue fiberglass cloth, then coated with resin and fiberglass mat. The backside of the dash was covered with four layers of Dynamat Extreme. The custom design fits closer to the firewall and is more open underneath than the factory dash, aiding in sound flow.

The diffraction ring shown here on the mid driver is designed to eliminate the secondary lobes of the woofer from disrupting the primary lobe. The seats were built and positioned to optimize the audio in the primary lobe; any interference would not be good.

The remote volume knob for the Denon source unit was created using the original volume potentiometer and a custom-built bracket and knob. The knob and housing are machined aluminum, backlit with white LEDs to match the source unit. A simple piece of vacuum hose slides over the original knob and retains all the function of the original.

The subwoofer enclosures in the rear (as well as the front sub) of the Regal were built to survive a nuclear holocaust. The woofer rings are 31/44" MDF. The frames were wrapped in Select Products' red cloth and then coated with resin and fiberglass mat. Then the inside of the enclosure was reinforced with a mixture of polyester resin, 11/44" milled fibers and lead shot (as in the little BBs inside a shotgun shell) and spread on the entire inside of the enclosure. This not only added weight to the enclosure, it dropped the resonant frequency below the tuning frequency of the enclosure. The 15" GTi subs play from 30hz and down. The enclosure is bolted to the floor of the vehicle.

While some may balk at this design, it's tried and true - just look at the seven World-Champion trophies on Biggs' shelf. The speaker baffles began as two 1"-square tubing frames welded to the side of the vehicle. Then the 11/44" billet plate was bolted to the frames. The baffles sit parallel to each other, optimizing the 30-degree off-axis response of the JBL 660 GTi components.

This is the kickpanel as viewed without the dash in place. Most people think the grille is the actual speaker location. However, this is a ruse to keep the competition at bay. The actual speaker mounting is in the aluminum plate behind the panel.

The inside of the enclosure is covered in a 11/42" thick layer of modeling clay. The enclosure is also vented to the outside with an aperiodic membrane shown here (the mesh on the right side of the hole). The idea behind this baffling design is to couple the enclosure to the vehicle; the kick panels are just as important as the subwoofer enclosure. The enclosure is approximately 0.5 cubic feet.

The amprack for the three JBL amps was designed with a specific purpose. The amps sit 31/44" off the back, creating a sound trap, deflecting the sound to the trunk where it stays. Biggs wanted the entire vehicle to be "alive" but not reflective.

The entire firewall was, as the rest of the car, treated with four layers of Dynamat Extreme. Everything that was not absolutely necessary was removed from the firewall to get it as smooth and uncluttered as possible. Note the complete lack of a center channel, most people think there is one hidden under the dash, but no, the only mids and highs are the set of components in the kicks.

http://www.caraudiomag.com/features/cae_0706_biggs_regal_in_car_audio/index.html


[URL=http://imageshack.us][img]http://img411.imageshack.us/img411/7530/garybiggs00oe2.jpg[/img][/URL]

[URL=http://imageshack.us][img]http://img411.imageshack.us/img411/2246/dscf0364ch4.jpg[/img][/URL]

[URL=http://imageshack.us][img]http://img186.imageshack.us/img186/4589/normalimg8218ff2.jpg[/img][/URL]

[URL=http://imageshack.us][img]http://img187.imageshack.us/img187/9427/normalimg8219tc5.jpg[/img][/URL]

[URL=http://imageshack.us][img]http://img187.imageshack.us/img187/3532/normalimg8221an4.jpg[/img][/URL]

[URL=http://imageshack.us][img]http://img187.imageshack.us/img187/8067/normalimg8222tf8.jpg[/img][/URL]

[URL=http://imageshack.us][img]http://img187.imageshack.us/img187/6456/garybiggs17is7.jpg[/img][/URL]

[URL=http://imageshack.us][img]http://img292.imageshack.us/img292/1933/normalimg8225oq2.jpg[/img][/URL]

[URL=http://imageshack.us][img]http://img411.imageshack.us/img411/4061/normalimg8226ah4.jpg[/img][/URL]

[URL=http://imageshack.us][img]http://img187.imageshack.us/img187/5210/usac03032vp6.jpg[/img][/URL]

[URL=http://imageshack.us][img]http://img165.imageshack.us/img165/1636/dsc5763ey8.jpg[/img][/URL]

En version Kicker

[URL=http://imageshack.us][img]http://img411.imageshack.us/img411/8862/2002usac109xk7.jpg[/img][/URL]

[URL=http://imageshack.us][img]http://img165.imageshack.us/img165/1640/garybiggs03ul1.jpg[/img][/URL]

[URL=http://imageshack.us][img]http://img187.imageshack.us/img187/7781/garybiggs05ba1.jpg[/img][/URL]
Ludobrev
 
Message(s) : 2160
Inscription : 29 Décembre 2004, 23:00

Installes bi-stereo

Message par Ludobrev » 06 Septembre 2008, 10:45

Une installe JBL bien sympatique
!!!
http://caraudionationals.com/photos/tulsa/images/1794/original.aspx

http://caraudionationals.com/photos/tulsa/images/1795/original.aspx

http://caraudionationals.com/photos/tulsa/images/1796/original.aspx

http://caraudionationals.com/photos/tulsa/images/1797/original.aspx

http://caraudionationals.com/photos/tulsa/images/1798/original.aspx

http://caraudionationals.com/photos/tulsa/images/1605/original.aspx
Ludobrev
 
Message(s) : 2160
Inscription : 29 Décembre 2004, 23:00

Installes bi-stereo

Message par Ludobrev » 23 Novembre 2008, 22:16

http://www.buwaldahybrids.com/phpBB3/viewtopic.php?f=26&t=4040
Ludobrev
 
Message(s) : 2160
Inscription : 29 Décembre 2004, 23:00

Installes bi-stereo

Message par Ludobrev » 23 Novembre 2008, 22:18

Miam miam!!!! (Superbe tableau de bord)
http://www.buwaldahybrids.com/phpBB3/viewtopic.php?f=26&t=4053
Ludobrev
 
Message(s) : 2160
Inscription : 29 Décembre 2004, 23:00

Installes bi-stereo

Message par Ludobrev » 24 Novembre 2008, 10:21

[URL=http://imageshack.us][img]http://img56.imageshack.us/img56/8053/cimg0449nj8.jpg[/img][/URL]

[URL=http://imageshack.us][img]http://img262.imageshack.us/img262/6383/cimg1776kg0.jpg[/img][/URL]

:arrow:
Ludobrev
 
Message(s) : 2160
Inscription : 29 Décembre 2004, 23:00

Installes bi-stereo

Message par Ludobrev » 21 Mars 2009, 11:47

[URL=http://img25.imageshack.us/my.php?image=cae070701z2000hondacivi.jpg][img]http://img25.imageshack.us/img25/4995/cae070701z2000hondacivi.jpg[/img][/URL]


[URL=http://imageshack.us][img]http://img262.imageshack.us/img262/6383/cimg1776kg0.jpg[/img][/URL]

[URL=http://img13.imageshack.us/my.php?image=p1010911x.jpg][img]http://img13.imageshack.us/img13/7086/p1010911x.jpg[/img][/URL]

[URL=http://img13.imageshack.us/my.php?image=p1010913t.jpg][img]http://img13.imageshack.us/img13/5083/p1010913t.jpg[/img][/URL]

[URL=http://img13.imageshack.us/my.php?image=p1010914k.jpg][img]http://img13.imageshack.us/img13/2326/p1010914k.jpg[/img][/URL]

http://www.caraudiomag.com/features/cae_0707_2000_honda_civic/index.html

2000 Honda Civic - Future Studio
A Honda Civic Becomes A High-End Listening Room
By Timothy Sprinkle
Photography by Carl Edwards

Why settle for a proven show car winner when you can completely tear one apart and start from scratch? After all, that's what Broken Arrow, Oklahoma-based competitors Christerfer Pate and Gary Biggs, did last year with Pate's 2000 Honda Civic. During the yearlong project they turned a mild-mannered, sound quality focused Civic into an otherworldly version of what a mobile audio system could look like.

"The install was based on transforming the car into a room in which to experience music," Pate explains. "Gary came up with the idea to build the interior around the sound system versus building the sound system around the car. So we got rid of the steering wheel, made everything computerized and got rid of everything we could. Basically, we built a small room inside a car."

And that small room that Pate says is modeled after a music studio is what makes this Civic different.

InstallersChristerfer PateGary Biggs

Driver ProfilePate got into car audio when he was 12 years old and later worked his way through college at an installation shop. Now he's a member of Team Car Toys of Tulsa and competes in the Expert category with USACi, IASCA and MECA.

Thank You'sChristerfer would like to thank his wife Erica; co-creator Gary Biggs; Kent Bueller and Nick Wingate at ORCA Designs; Car Toys of Tulsa; Jan and Monte Bennet; Jeff and Grim at Carefree Paint and Body; Jeff Tealeo; Charles Stewart; and his bosses Nick Wingate, Jeff Tiel, Charles Stewart, Rob Rice and Don Tessier for giving him time off to run all over the country for competitions.

To complete the look that was created for the interior, Pate lowered the Civic and installed a custom race exhaust. A silver and black paint job and 18" wheels round things out. "We built up a motor in there even though I never drive it," he laughs.

While the 8" subs help out in front, it's the Focal 40KX 16" subwoofer that really handles the bass in the Civic. It's mounted in a custom rack that Pate refers to as the "bigmouth frog." "It's all curved so there are no standing waves," he explains, adding that it was made out of 1" steel tubing, 31/44" and 11/44" MDF, and "a ton of fiberglass," all hand sanded. "We painted it because it was such a crazy sculpted piece."

DashIn an effort to isolate the sound system and create a studio-like space inside the Civic, Pate and Co. completely re-imagined the interior of the car, removing the gauge array, the AC vents and just about any other recognizable part of a modern dashboard. The smooth, carpeted result houses a Denon DCT-Z1 head unit and a 10.2" LCD computer monitor in a custom fiberglass dash insert. "The dash itself is designed to let sound basically flow through it as opposed to having different things bounce around," Pate says. "It's totally symmetrical on both sides - very clean, very custom - but at the same time doesn't detract from the audio experience and that's the plan."

The dash and doors weren't the only parts of the interior redesigned. Pate and Biggs also went after the floorboards, removing the transfer hub and leaving the floor totally flat. "It's built a lot like a recording studio to prevent standing waves and the sound won't catch on your feet." Under the hood they took out the compressor and added a second alternator to isolate the stereo system and computer from the car's normal electrical system. Four caps, extra batteries and a fuse holder located in the bumper ensure that there's always plenty of clean, filtered power running directly to the amps in the back.

Although Pate isn't ready to reveal where the front speakers are mounted, he will say that a pair of Focal Beryllium 6W2 6" drivers, Beryllium tweeters and a pair of Focal Beryllium 21WX 8" subs create the Civic's soundstage. And aside from a 16" sub in the back, these are the only speakers in the car.

While he considers the Denon DCT-Z1 receiver an upgrade, Pate is realistic about its capabilities. "It's a rare head unit," he says, "very clean, sounds very good, not a lot of jitter. But there are no bells and whistles on it - it's just a CD transport head unit." That's where the onboard PC comes in. It's loaded with Streetdeck audio software that lets Pate play movies, organize his MP3s, operate the navigation system and do everything else the stripped-down head unit can't handle. The software also manages the Focal Dual Monitor amps mounted in the rear and allows Pate to tune just about everything in the car, including the head unit. "It allows us to do a lot of things and still have the stripped-down look that we wanted."

Describing the dash area as "toned down," Pate admits they went a little wild when it came time to sketch out the back. Four really big Focal Dual Monitor amplifiers power the system - one for the front-mounted tweeters, one for the 6" mids, one for the 8" front subs, and one for the rear 16" - all mounted in a custom amprack built under the rear sub enclosure. Pate and Biggs fabricated the amprack using 1" steel tubing and MDF that was then wrapped in leather.

Like the dash, Pate and Biggs designed the doors with an eye toward preventing sound distortions. Each custom vinyl-covered door is lined with sound dampening material and fitted with a studio bass trap. "A lot of times in a car you get a lot of loading, since bass will load up in different directions," Pate says. "But in studios, they fix this by putting these bass traps in the corners so you'll only get the bass that's part of the true audio."
Ludobrev
 
Message(s) : 2160
Inscription : 29 Décembre 2004, 23:00

Installes bi-stereo

Message par Ludobrev » 19 Août 2009, 18:18

http://www.dynamicautoacoustics.com/forum/index.php?topic=152.15
Ludobrev
 
Message(s) : 2160
Inscription : 29 Décembre 2004, 23:00

Installes bi-stereo

Message par neoprene » 30 Août 2009, 20:50

[quote]Warning!
The topic or board you are looking for appears to be either missing or off limits to you.
Please login below or register an account with Dynamic Auto Acoustics.
Login
Username:
Password:
Minutes to stay logged in:
Always stay logged in:
Forgot your password?[/quote]
La liste des bannissements a été mise à jour.
Avatar de l’utilisateur
neoprene
 
Message(s) : 2715
Inscription : 09 Octobre 2001, 22:00

Suivant

Retour vers Nulle part ailleurs

Qui est en ligne ?

Utilisateur(s) parcourant ce forum : Aucun utilisateur inscrit et 3 invité(s)


Lancé en septembre 2007, mensup.fr est le premier portail français à s'être consacré à la thématique lifestyle au masculin. En 2010, Men's UP TV investit le PAF avec ce même positionnement unique. Men's UP propose par ailleurs deux verticales dédiées à des univers fortement masculine : l'horlogerie au quotidien avec UPtime et l'actualité automobile au quotidien avec Autodeclics.com.

un site WARM UP interactive - mentions légales - contacts